Jacki Kellum

Juxtapositions: Read My Mind

Category: Jacki Kellum Genealogy

My Family Owned British Estates with Secret Chambers to Hide Catholic Priests – How Medieval England’s Religious Persecution Affected My Family

Allow me to preface all of this by saying that during my childhood, the Whitaker side of my family [who married a Dunscomb, also of England] were fire and brimstone Southern Baptists. I remember when Kennedy was elelcted president. We Southern Baptists thought that civilization had come to an end. Imagine my surprise to learn that some of my earliest ancestors owned British estates with large houses that had secret hiding places to hide Catholic Priests.

The Holme – The Whitaker Ancestral Estate in Burnley, Lancashire, England

Richard Whitaker was knighted in 1327 by King Edward III. He owned a 40-room estate called The Holme. The Whitaker family owned The Holme from 1431-1959. Holme Hall [as well as other of the Whitaker estates] is mentioned in the book Secret Chambers and Hiding Places.

Image result for Secret Chambers and Hiding Places

‘It was originally a 40-room manor house…and as the seat of the Whitaker family from the 15th century. The first Whitaker to arrive at The Holme was believed to be Richard de Whitacre, who arrived in Cliviger in 1340 from “High Whiteacre” at Padliham. … Originally built of wood, the center and eastern wing were rebuilt by 1603. The west remaned of wood until 1717 and had one or more private closets for the concealment of priests, the family have continued as recusants until the end of Elizabeth’s reign, if not later.” More Here

SECRET CHAMBERS AND HIDING-PLACES

CHAPTER I

A GREAT DEVISER OF “PRIEST’S HOLES”

“During the deadly feuds which existed in the Middle Ages, when no man was secure from spies and traitors even within the walls of his own house, it is no matter of wonder that the castles and mansions of the powerful and wealthy were usually provided with some precaution in the event of a sudden surprise—viz. a secret means of concealment or escape that could be used at a moment’s notice; but the majority of secret chambers and hiding-places in our ancient buildings owe their origin to religious persecution, particularly during the reign of Elizabeth, when the most stringent laws and oppressive burdens were inflicted upon all persons who professed the tenets of the Church of Rome.

“In the first years of the virgin Queen’s reign all who clung to the older forms of the Catholic faith were mercifully connived at, so long as they solemnised their own religious rites within their private dwelling-houses; but after the Roman Catholic rising in the north and numerous other Popish plots, the utmost severity of the law was enforced, particularly against seminarists, whose chief object was, as was generally believed, to stir up their disciples in England against the Protestant Queen. An Act was passed prohibiting a member of the Church of Rome from celebrating the rites of his religion on pain of forfeiture for the first offence, a year’s imprisonment for the second, and imprisonment for life for the third.[1] All those who refused to take the Oath of Supremacy were called “recusants” and were guilty of high treason. A law was also enacted which provided that if any Papist should convert a Protestant to the Church of Rome, both should suffer death, as for high treason.

“[Footnote 1: In December, 1591, a priest was hanged before the door of a house in Gray’s Inn Fields for having there said Mass the month previously.]

“The sanguinary laws against seminary priests and “recusants” were enforced with the greatest severity after the discovery of the Gunpowder Plot. These were revived for a period in Charles II.’s reign, when Oates’s plot worked up a fanatical hatred against all professors of the ancient faith. In the mansions of the old Roman Catholic families we often find an apartment in a secluded part of the house or garret in the roof named “the chapel,” where religious rites could be performed with the utmost privacy, and close handy was usually an artfully contrived hiding-place, not only for the officiating priest to slip into in case of emergency, but also where the vestments, sacred vessels, and altar furniture could be put away at a moment’s notice.” Read More Here

Tonight, I was watching Father Brown Mysteries. Season 2, Episode 1 is about the secret chambers in British estates. That reminded me of the my own family and their secret chambers.

Oddly enough, another of my ancestors, Reverend William Whitaker was a noted protestant:

Reverend William Whitaker and Susan Whitaker

Birthdate: December 1547 (48)
Birthplace: Holme, Burnley, Lancaster Co., United Kingdom
Death: December 4, 1595 (47)
Holme, Lancaster, England, United Kingdom
Place of Burial: Trinity College,Cambridge,England
Immediate Family:
Son of Richard Thomas Whitaker and Elizabeth Whitaker

Master of St. John’s College, Cambridge University, MASTER OF ST JOHN, CAMBRIDGE, Theologian and Academic, Master of St. Johns College Cambridge
Reverend William Whitaker was vehemently Protestant and against the Catholic Church, and he wrote an important document that supported a study of the scriptures. His ancestors were recusants and had supported the Catholic Church and are believed to have hidden Catholic priests in closets at the Holme. “His [William’s] work, Disputatio de Sacra Scriptura contra hujus temporis papistas, inprimis Robertum Bellarminum, or Disputations on Holy Scripture, remains one of the premier volumes on the doctrine of Scripture, often under-appreciated, little read, but standing like a titan amongst the volumes of the English Reformed Churchman. One of the premier issues that divided and still divides informed Protestants from Roman Catholics is the question of the place of Scripture. Reformed Churchmmen like Whittaker, then like now, declared that the Scriptures alone are the rule of faith and practice whereas Roman Catholics assert co-equal veneration and co-authoritative roles between Scripture, traditions held by the Church and other unwritten issues. This debate is not new. William Whitaker forcefully and brilliantly championed the Protestant, Reformed and Anglican position in 1588. ” Wikipedia

A Robert Whitaker was one of Reverend William Whitaker’s descendants and is also one of my ancestors. He married Margaret Lisle Whitaker. An interesting fact is that Margaret’s parents were both killed because of their protestant beliefs.  Margaret’s father was instrumental in ousting King Charles and when Charles II reclaimed the throne, he fled to Switzerland where he was murdered. Margaret’s mother was the last lady in England to be beheaded. She was executed because she had harbored protestants.

Margaret Whitaker [Daughter of Sir Sir John Lisle (Descendant of King Edward III) and  Alice Beconsawe Lisle (1617 – 1685)

[Note: Alice Beconsawe Lisle was sympathetic with the religious dissenters. Her husband Sir John Lisle was an ant-Royalist who played a part in the de-throning of King Charles. Because Alice harbored fugitives of the  Monmouth Rebellion at the Battle of Sedgemoor, she was beheaded. She was the last female to be beheaded in England. Dame Alice was a daughter of Sir White Beconshaw of Moyles Court at Ellingham in Hampshire and his wife Edith Bond, daughter and co-heiress of William Bond of Blackmanston in Steeple, Dorset. She had a younger sister, Elizabeth, who married Sir Thomas Tipping of Wheatfield Park in Stoke Talmage in Oxfordshire. Alice became the second wife of Sir John Lisle (1610 – 11 August 1664), and bore him seven children.[1] Lisle was an English lawyer and politician who sat in the House of Commons at various times between 1640 and 1659. He supported the Parliamentarian cause in the English Civil War and was one of the regicides of King Charles I of England.[3] Fearing for his life after the Restoration he fled to Switzerland, but was assassinated by an agent of the crown in Lausanne in 1664.” Wikipedia]

“He [John Lisle] advocated violent measures on the king’s removal to the north, and obtained some of the plunder arising from the sale of the crown property. To the fund opened on 9 April 1642 for the “speedy reducing of the rebels” in Ireland, Lisle contributed _600. In December 1647, when the king was confined in the Isle of Wight, Lisle was selected as one of the commissioners to carry to him the four bills which were to divest him of all sovereignty. He spoke in the House of Commons on 28 Sept 1648 in favor of rescinding the recent vote, that no one proposition in regard to the personal treaty with the king should be binding if the treaty broke off upon another; and again, some days later, urged a discontinuance of the negotiation with Charles. He took a prominent part in the king’s trial. He was appointed on 8 Feb 1648/9 one of the commissioners of the great seal, and was placed on the council of state. He was a violent anti-royalist, and active promoter of the King’s trial, and drafted the sentence. He was present in Westminster Hall, 27 Jan 1648/9, when the sentence was pronounced, though he did not sign the death-warrant.[3]” More Here 

John Lisle’s Estate was at Northcourt Manor and Westcourt

Northcourt

Sunken Rose Garden at Northcourt

Northcourt Kitchen Garden Gate

Northcourt Garden

Northcourt Countryside

Northcourt Garden Building

The above image is of Westcourt

 The Regicide’s Widow tells Alice Lisle’s story:

“Rebellion, persecution and injustice in Restoration England are the themes of this colourful and passionate book about the last woman to be beheaded in England. Lady Alice Lisle was the last remaining link with the hated regicides, the men who signed Charles I’s death warrant, and when she gave shelter to a clergyman who had been involved in the popular uprising known as Monmouth’s Rebellion, Judge Jeffreys, the ‘Hanging Judge’, showed no mercy. “The Regicide’s Widow” recreates a disturbing period of British history through the characters of Lady Alice Lisle and Judge Jeffreys, a period when fairness, justice and truth were cast aside in the interests of political power and conformity. It is a truly Machiavellian story of statecraft, with government and judiciary involved in a ruthless display of might. In the end this display worked against them, for while it did not lead to direct revolt, the effects were so harsh and memories so vivid that the people of the West were among the most energetic supporters of the Glorious Revolution which three years after the Bloody Assize brought James’ rule to an end.” Amazon

“By about 1660 after the King Charles II had been restored to the throne, John was forced to flee to Switzerland in fear of his life. Alice was left behind in England, pregnant with their youngest daughter Anne.  About this time, all of John’s holdings were seized by the crown, with the majority going to James, the king’s brother and to John Lisle’s younger brother William who remained a royalist.  Thank goodness Moyles Court belonged to Alice, but her fortunes had definitely declined.  She still had seven unmarried children to raise….

“In 1664 when Alice was 47, her husband was assassinated in Switzerland, shot in the back by an Irish royalist.  She was left an outcast from family as well as society, and ridiculed for her religion.  According to the excellent and well researched book titled “The Regicide’s Widow”: “Moyles Court became one of the many refuges of these Nonconformist nomads [displaced ministers], and Alice Lisle undoubtedly risked prosecution for those she sheltered.”  There was a reported gathering of 200 Presbyterians there in 1669.

“So how did Alice end up sheltering the rebel John Hicks and get convicted of treason? Alice knew of Hicks as a nonconformist minister, most recently from Portsmouth.  Through a succession of restrictive laws and political maneuvering, the religious bigotry in England increased through the 1670s and 80s.  The mood and whim of those in power seemed to oscillate between leniency and oppressive persecution. I’m sure that Hicks wasn’t the only minister who was relentlessly targeted, tracked and fined for preaching to gatherings of nonconformists.  But the timing and location was such that on 24 Jun 1685,  Hicks was on hand to join rebel forces of the crown contender James Scott, Duke of Monmouth.  He probably hoped that he would receive better treatment and liberties under a different monarch.   The next day Hicks committed the treasonable offense of trying to persuade Monmouth’s English prisoners of war  to change their allegiance.

Their cause was short lived, for the rebel forces were quickly defeated by James II’s troops, with many rebels fleeing.  After a concentrated manhunt, Monmouth and his chiefs were captured and beheaded, although some of his rebels remained at large.  This is when Hicks and his companions Nelthorp and Dunne sought shelter at Moyles Court.  Their arrival was betrayed by their guide, and Alice was arrested as well as the fugitives and jailed at Salisbury pending trial.

PictureGrave of Alice (Beconshawe) Lisle in Ellingham, Hampshire

circuit-preacher-1800's

I am fortunate that one of my great aunts researched my family’s genealogical record. Her grandfather was a Southern Baptist preacher.

Rev. Milton John Whitaker (1832-1908)

Whitaker, Milton John (Rev.) 1832-1908

My Dunscomb ancestors were Quakers and one of them was killed at the Isle of Wight. His wife brought their sons to America and joined the Quakers in Philadelphia. I find it interesting that after a lifetime in the South, I have managed to live my final years near Philadelphia.

I am not sure why it matters who our ancestors are, but somehow, I do care. I am posting this information for any of my family who are interested in our heritage. I am also posting this information for other Whitakers who are seeking some of the research that I have discovered. The Internet has vastly changed the nature of genealogical research. Researchers must be careful, but if they are cautious, they can find tomes of information about their families by simply searching through Google. I am thankful to my great aunt who helped me begin my research, and I am also thankful to my distant relatives who have helped me reconnect with my family’s story.

©Jacki Kellum August 20, 2017

 

My Whitaker Family Tree from England

[Note: The earliest part of this genealogy is disputed. It seems to me that the facts become more certain by about 1300, with the birth of Sir Richard de Whitacre. Wikipedia lists his great grandfather as Thomas, and the following lineage does not show Richard’s great grandfather to be Thomas.Thomas Whitaker was born in the 1400’s. Perhaps the Wikipedia article should call Thomas Sir Richard’s great great grandson. If anyone can shed light on what I have shared, please contact me.  You will also note that the name Whitaker is spelled in many different ways.]

Johias Whitaker and Mrs. Johias Whitaker

Birthdate: 1042 (24)
Birthplace: Generation, England
Death: 1066 (24) Battle of Hastings, Hastings, East Sussex, England

Image result for battle of hastings

“Johias Whitacre (1042-1066) died while fighting at the Battle of Hastings on the side of King Harold. Nevertheless, this family was allowed to keep their lands in Warwickshire and continued to rise to prominence throughout the Medieval period.: Wikipedia

Immediate Family:
Husband of Mrs. Johias Whitaker
Father of Edwinus Whitaker

Edwinus Whitaker and Mrs. Edwinus Whitaker

Birthdate: 1050 (37)
Birthplace: Generation, England
Death: 1087 (37)
England, United Kingdom
Immediate Family:
Son of Johias Whitaker and Mrs. Johias Whitaker
Husband of Mrs. Edwinus Whitaker
Father of Sir Simon Whitaker, Sir

Sir Simon Whitaker, Sir and Mrs. Simon Whitacer

Birthdate: 1080 (55)
Birthplace: England, United Kingdom
Death: 1135 (55)
England, United Kingdom
Immediate Family:
Son of Edwinus Whitaker and Mrs. Edwinus Whitaker
Husband of Mrs. Simon Whitacer
Father of Alanus Whitaker

Alanus Whitaker and Mrs. Alanus Whitacer

Birthdate: circa 1133 (94)
Birthplace: Generation, England
Death: 1227 (90-98)
Generation, England
Immediate Family:
Son of Sir Simon Whitaker, Sir and Mrs. Simon Whitacer
Husband of Mrs. Alanus Whitacer
Father of Sir Jordan Whitaker

Sir Jordan Whitaker and Phillipa Astleymil

Also Known As: “Quitacre”
Birthdate: circa 1200 (75)
Birthplace: England
Death: circa 1275 (67-83)
England, United Kingdom
Immediate Family:
Son of Alanus Whitaker and Mrs. Alanus Whitacer
Husband of Phillipa Astleymil
Father of Sir John Whitaker

Sir John Whitaker, Sr. and Donia De Whitaker

Also Known As: “Quitacre”
Birthdate: 1240 (38)
Birthplace: Padiham, Lancashire, England
Death: 1278 (38)
Symonstone Hall, Lancashire, England
Immediate Family:
Son of Sir Jordan Whitaker and Phillipa Astleymil
Husband of Donia De Whitaker
Father of Roger De Whitaker and Sir John Whitaker

Sir John de Whitacre and Amice de Marmion Whitaker

Also Known As: “Quitacre” and de Whitacre
Birthdate: circa 1275 (55)
Death: circa 1330 (47-63)
Immediate Family:
Son of Sir John Whitaker and Donia De Whitaker
Husband of Amice Whitaker
Father of Richard Simon Whitaker, Sir John de Whitacre – Confirmer of the Magna Carta

Amice or Alice de Marmion was an Heiress

Name: Amice (Alice) MARMION 1
Sex: F
Birth: ABT 1303 in Glascote, Tamworth, Warwickshire, England

Father: Robert MARMION , of Glascote, Sir b: ABT 1263 in Tamworth Castle, Warwickshire, England
Mother: Isabel FITZRALPH , Heiress of Glascote b: ABT 1273 in Glascote, Tamworth, Warwickshire, England

Marriage 1 John de WHITACRE b: ABT 1300 in Nether Whitacre, Meriden, Warwickshire, England

Sir Richard de Whitacre (circa 1300-1375) was the Lord of the Manors of Nether Whitacre, Over Whitacre, Elmdon, and Freasley.

Image result for Whitacre Hall Gatehouse at Whiteacre Hall

“Whitacre Hall, ¾ mile north-east of the church, is an L-shaped house facing south, of which the south block was rebuilt in the 18th century: the back wing is probably of the 17th century and has very heavy chamfered ceiling-beams. The walls are rough-casted. The chief interest is the large square moated area, which is of medieval origin and was evidently constructed for defensive purposes. The moat is stonelined on the inner faces, and at each angle except the north-eastern is a square shell-tower of red sandstone with open sides towards the internal area. Each wall, including the two short sides overlooking the length of the moat, is pierced by a loop. Spanning the south arm on solid foundations (not arched) is a small Elizabethan gate house, large enough to admit a small vehicle, built of red brick and having an outer curvilinear gable-head. The entrance, in a square recess on the outer face, is round-headed and has the original nail-studded gate hung with plain strap-hinges. In it is a wicket door hung with large ornamental winghinges, nearly of cock’s head type, one original and one copy. The inner gable-head is of timber-framing with a moulded cambered bressummer or tie-beam facially carved with running foliage. The framing has two quatrefoils in squares and other patterns, a fleur de lis, acorns, and a rose-sprig, with plaster infilling. The side-walls have upper and lower loops overlooking the moat and have moulded wall-plates. Outside the moat are timber-framed farm-buildings.” Read More Here

Image result for Whitacre Hall

Nether Whiteacre Hallughton Hall

“Over Whitacre is a hamlet in the North Warwickshire district of the county of Warwickshire in England. The population of the village at the 2011 census was 411.[1]

It is one of ‘The Whitacres’ – Over Whitacre, Nether Whitacre and Whitacre Heath, although Whitacre Heath is actually the heath of Nether Whitacre and not a separate parish.

The hamlet appears in the Domesday Book so it was already established in the Saxon period. However, objects belonging to much earlier Neolithic and Bronze Age times have been found in the soil. Whitacre was spelt then as ‘Witecore’ which means white field.” Wikipedia

“His [Sir Richard’s] principal seat was at Whitacre Hall, a Medieval fortified manor house in Nether Whitacre.

His family, being of Anglo-Saxon descent, were of the very few who were allowed to keep their lands after the Norman Conquest. In fact, his ancestor Johias Whitacre (1042-1066) died while fighting at the Battle of Hastings on the side of King Harold. Nevertheless, this family was allowed to keep their lands in Warwickshire and continued to rise to prominence throughout the Medieval period.

Sir Richard was knighted by King Edward III in 1327. He fought in the King’s personal retinue during the English victories at Calais and Crecy during the Hundred Years’ War. For this, it is believed that he received lands in Padiham, Lancashire, where his descendants would eventually move to, settling at The Holme. He was a vassal of the Baron Tamworth, then in the Marmion family of which his mother was a part, who were lords of Tamworth Castle where Sir Richard is known to have fulfilled many of his Knight-services.”

The Holme – The Whitaker Ancestral Estate in Burnley, Lancashire, England

“In 1431, reference was made to Thomas Whitaker of The Holme. ‘It was originally a 40-room manor house…and as the seat of the Whitaker family from the 15th century. The first Whitaker to arrive at The Holme was believed to be Richard de Whitacre, who arrived in Cliviger in 1340 from “High Whiteacre” at Padliham. … Originally built of wood, the center and eastern wing were rebuilt by 1603. The west remaned of wood until 1717 and had one or more private closets for the concealment of priests, the family have continued as recusants until the end of Elizabeth’s reign, if not later.” More Here

“In Burkes’ General Armory occurs the reference to the Whitakers of the Holme, Lancaster County, one of the oldest families with the longest line of proved descent and assumed to be the progenitors of most all by that name. This family is derived from Richard Whitaker of Holme, Esquire, living in 1543, the great grandson of Thomas Whitaker of Holme, A.D. 1431.”

“A number of Whittaker families, dating their ancestry from the sixteenth century, are identified in Burkes’ publications. The most distinguished of the name was the celebrated divine, the Reverend William Whittaker, professor of Divinity at Cambridge University, whose library was so famousthat is was purchased after his death by Queen Elizabeth I.” More Here

 

The Whitaker family owned The Holme from 1431-1959. Holme Hall is mentioned in the book Secret Chambers and Hiding Places

 

Image result for Secret Chambers and Hiding Places

SECRET CHAMBERS AND HIDING-PLACES

CHAPTER I

A GREAT DEVISER OF “PRIEST’S HOLES”

“During the deadly feuds which existed in the Middle Ages, when no man was secure from spies and traitors even within the walls of his own house, it is no matter of wonder that the castles and mansions of the powerful and wealthy were usually provided with some precaution in the event of a sudden surprise—viz. a secret means of concealment or escape that could be used at a moment’s notice; but the majority of secret chambers and hiding-places in our ancient buildings owe their origin to religious persecution, particularly during the reign of Elizabeth, when the most stringent laws and oppressive burdens were inflicted upon all persons who professed the tenets of the Church of Rome.

“In the first years of the virgin Queen’s reign all who clung to the older forms of the Catholic faith were mercifully connived at, so long as they solemnised their own religious rites within their private dwelling-houses; but after the Roman Catholic rising in the north and numerous other Popish plots, the utmost severity of the law was enforced, particularly against seminarists, whose chief object was, as was generally believed, to stir up their disciples in England against the Protestant Queen. An Act was passed prohibiting a member of the Church of Rome from celebrating the rites of his religion on pain of forfeiture for the first offence, a year’s imprisonment for the second, and imprisonment for life for the third.[1] All those who refused to take the Oath of Supremacy were called “recusants” and were guilty of high treason. A law was also enacted which provided that if any Papist should convert a Protestant to the Church of Rome, both should suffer death, as for high treason.

“[Footnote 1: In December, 1591, a priest was hanged before the door of a house in Gray’s Inn Fields for having there said Mass the month previously.]

“The sanguinary laws against seminary priests and “recusants” were enforced with the greatest severity after the discovery of the Gunpowder Plot. These were revived for a period in Charles II.’s reign, when Oates’s plot worked up a fanatical hatred against all professors of the ancient faith. In the mansions of the old Roman Catholic families we often find an apartment in a secluded part of the house or garret in the roof named “the chapel,” where religious rites could be performed with the utmost privacy, and close handy was usually an artfully contrived hiding-place, not only for the officiating priest to slip into in case of emergency, but also where the vestments, sacred vessels, and altar furniture could be put away at a moment’s notice.” Read More Here

Richard Simon Whitaker and Joan Cult

Also Known As: “Quitacre”
Birthdate: circa 1300 (75)
Birthplace: Symonstone Hall, Lancashire, England
Death: circa 1375 (67-83)
Symonstone Hall, Lancashire, England
Immediate Family:
Son of Sir John Whitaker and Amice Whitaker
Husband of Joan Cult
Father of Richard Whitaker

Richard Whitaker and Margaret Wallingscott

Also Known As: “Witacre”, “Whitaker”
Birthdate: 1380 (54)
Birthplace: Lancashire, UK
Death: 1434 (54)
Symonston Hall, Lancashire, England
Immediate Family:
Son of Richard Simon Whitaker, Sir; Richard Whitaker and Cornwallis
Husband of Margaret Wallingscott
Father of Thomas Whitaker; Humprey Whitaker and Cornwallis Whitaker

Thomas Whitaker and N.N.N.N.

Birthdate: 1405 (43)
Birthplace: Cliviger, Lancashire, UK
Death: 1448 (43)
Burnley, Lancashire, England, United Kingdom
Immediate Family:
Son of  Richard Whitaker Margaret Wallingscott
Husband of N.N. N.N.
Father of  Robert Whitaker

Robert Whitaker and N. N. Whitaker

Birthdate: 1432 (99)
Birthplace: Holme, North Yorkshire, UK
Death: 1531 (99)
Burnley, Lancashire, UK
Immediate Family:
Son of Thomas Whitaker and N.N. N.N.
Husband of N.N. Whitaker
Father of Thomas Cromwell Whitaker

Thomas Cromell Whitaker and Joanna Whitaker

Birthdate: circa 1458 (71)
Birthplace: Cambridge, Cambridgeshire, UK
Death: 1529 (67-75)
Cambridge, Cambridgeshire, UK
Immediate Family:
Son of Robert Whitaker and N.N. Whitaker
Husband of Joanna whitaker
Father of John Whitaker and Richard Whitaker

Richard Whitaker and N. N. Willascotts

Birthdate: circa 1475 (70)
Birthplace: Holme, Lancashire, UK
Death: 1545 (66-74)
Burnley, Lancashire, England
Immediate Family:
Son of Thomas Cromwell Whitaker and Joanna Whitaker
Husband of N.N. Willascotts

“A branch of the family lived at Holme, near Burnley, and descended from Richard, who settled there in the fourteenth century. Thomas Whitaker, of Holme, was living in 1431, and was followed by Robert, and then his son Thomas, who spelt his name Quitacre. Two generations later Thomas Whitaker, born in 1504, married Elizabeth Nowell, whose brother was Alexander Nowell, Dean of St. Paul’s. Their third son was William, who became Doctor of Divinity and Master of St. John’s College, Cambridge. William’s eldest brother Robert inherited Holme, and was succeeded by his son Thomas.” More Here

Richard Thomas Whitaker and Elizabeth Nowell Whitaker

Birthdate: September 22, 1504
Birthplace: Burnley (The Holme), Lancashire, England
Death: August 22, 1588 (83)
Cambridge, Cambridgeshire, UK
Immediate Family:
Son of Richard Whitaker and N.N. Willascotts
Husband of Elizabeth Whitaker

 Reverend William Whitaker and Susan Whitaker

Birthdate: December 1547 (48)
Birthplace: Holme, Burnley, Lancaster Co., United Kingdom
Death: December 4, 1595 (47)
Holme, Lancaster, England, United Kingdom
Place of Burial: Trinity College,Cambridge,England
Immediate Family:
Son of Richard Thomas Whitaker and Elizabeth Whitaker

Master of St. John’s College, Cambridge University, MASTER OF ST JOHN, CAMBRIDGE, Theologian and Academic, Master of St. Johns College Cambridge

Reverend William Whitaker was vehemently Protestant and against the Catholic Church, and he wrote an important document that supported a study of the scriptures. His ancestors were recusants and had supported the Catholic Church and are believed to have hidden Catholic priests in closets at the Holme. “His [William’s] work, Disputatio de Sacra Scriptura contra hujus temporis papistas, inprimis Robertum Bellarminum, or Disputations on Holy Scripture, remains one of the premier volumes on the doctrine of Scripture, often under-appreciated, little read, but standing like a titan amongst the volumes of the English Reformed Churchman. One of the premier issues that divided and still divides informed Protestants from Roman Catholics is the question of the place of Scripture. Reformed Churchmmen like Whittaker, then like now, declared that the Scriptures alone are the rule of faith and practice whereas Roman Catholics assert co-equal veneration and co-authoritative roles between Scripture, traditions held by the Church and other unwritten issues. This debate is not new. William Whitaker forcefully and brilliantly championed the Protestant, Reformed and Anglican position in 1588. ” Wikipedia

William Whitaker and Mary Whitaker

Birthdate: 1580 (58)
Birthplace: Holm, Yorkshire, England
Death: 1638 (57)
Holme, Huntingdonshire, England
Immediate Family:
Son of Rev. William Whitaker and Susan Whitaker
Husband of Mary Whitaker
Father of Robert Whitaker, I

Robert Whitaker owned Simonstone Hall

Robert Sr. Whitaker, I [His grandson immigrated to America] and

Birth:    circa 1604

Padiham, , Lancashire, England

Robert Whitaker, I
Birthdate: 1604 (84)
Birthplace: Symondstone, [Simonstone] Padiham, England
Death: March 5, 1688 (84)
Dovecoatgil Parish, Yorkshire, England
Immediate Family:
Son of William Whitaker and Mary Whitaker

Robert Whitaker, Il and Margaret

Birth:    March 29, 1637

North Yorkshire, England

Death: February 6, 1741 (103)

Grindletown, York, England

Immediate Family:

Son of Robert Sr. Whitaker

Husband of Margaret Whitaker [Daughter of Sir Sir John Lisle (Descendant of King Edward III) and  Alice Beconsawe Lisle (1617 – 1685)

[Note: Alice Beconsawe Lisle was sympathetic with the religious dissenters. Her husband Sir John Lisle was an ant-Royalist who played a part in the de-throning of King Charles. Because Alice harbored fugitives of the  Monmouth Rebellion at the Battle of Sedgemoor, she was beheaded. She was the last female to be beheaded in England. Dame Alice was a daughter of Sir White Beconshaw of Moyles Court at Ellingham in Hampshire and his wife Edith Bond, daughter and co-heiress of William Bond of Blackmanston in Steeple, Dorset. She had a younger sister, Elizabeth, who married Sir Thomas Tipping of Wheatfield Park in Stoke Talmage in Oxfordshire. Alice became the second wife of Sir John Lisle (1610 – 11 August 1664), and bore him seven children.[1] Lisle was an English lawyer and politician who sat in the House of Commons at various times between 1640 and 1659. He supported the Parliamentarian cause in the English Civil War and was one of the regicides of King Charles I of England.[3] Fearing for his life after the Restoration he fled to Switzerland, but was assassinated by an agent of the crown in Lausanne in 1664.” Wikipedia]

“He [John Lisle] advocated violent measures on the king’s removal to the north, and obtained some of the plunder arising from the sale of the crown property. To the fund opened on 9 April 1642 for the “speedy reducing of the rebels” in Ireland, Lisle contributed _600. In December 1647, when the king was confined in the Isle of Wight, Lisle was selected as one of the commissioners to carry to him the four bills which were to divest him of all sovereignty. He spoke in the House of Commons on 28 Sept 1648 in favor of rescinding the recent vote, that no one proposition in regard to the personal treaty with the king should be binding if the treaty broke off upon another; and again, some days later, urged a discontinuance of the negotiation with Charles. He took a prominent part in the king’s trial. He was appointed on 8 Feb 1648/9 one of the commissioners of the great seal, and was placed on the council of state. He was a violent anti-royalist, and active promoter of the King’s trial, and drafted the sentence. He was present in Westminster Hall, 27 Jan 1648/9, when the sentence was pronounced, though he did not sign the death-warrant.[3]” More Here

John Lisle’s Estate was at Northcourt Manor and Westcourt

Northcourt

Sunken Rose Garden at Northcourt

Northcourt Kitchen Garden Gate

Northcourt Garden

Northcourt Countryside

Northcourt Garden Building

The above image is of Westcourt

 The Regicide’s Widow tells Alice Lisle’s story:

“Rebellion, persecution and injustice in Restoration England are the themes of this colourful and passionate book about the last woman to be beheaded in England. Lady Alice Lisle was the last remaining link with the hated regicides, the men who signed Charles I’s death warrant, and when she gave shelter to a clergyman who had been involved in the popular uprising known as Monmouth’s Rebellion, Judge Jeffreys, the ‘Hanging Judge’, showed no mercy. “The Regicide’s Widow” recreates a disturbing period of British history through the characters of Lady Alice Lisle and Judge Jeffreys, a period when fairness, justice and truth were cast aside in the interests of political power and conformity. It is a truly Machiavellian story of statecraft, with government and judiciary involved in a ruthless display of might. In the end this display worked against them, for while it did not lead to direct revolt, the effects were so harsh and memories so vivid that the people of the West were among the most energetic supporters of the Glorious Revolution which three years after the Bloody Assize brought James’ rule to an end.” Amazon

“By about 1660 after the King Charles II had been restored to the throne, John was forced to flee to Switzerland in fear of his life. Alice was left behind in England, pregnant with their youngest daughter Anne.  About this time, all of John’s holdings were seized by the crown, with the majority going to James, the king’s brother and to John Lisle’s younger brother William who remained a royalist.  Thank goodness Moyles Court belonged to Alice, but her fortunes had definitely declined.  She still had seven unmarried children to raise….

“In 1664 when Alice was 47, her husband was assassinated in Switzerland, shot in the back by an Irish royalist.  She was left an outcast from family as well as society, and ridiculed for her religion.  According to the excellent and well researched book titled “The Regicide’s Widow”: “Moyles Court became one of the many refuges of these Nonconformist nomads [displaced ministers], and Alice Lisle undoubtedly risked prosecution for those she sheltered.”  There was a reported gathering of 200 Presbyterians there in 1669.

“So how did Alice end up sheltering the rebel John Hicks and get convicted of treason? Alice knew of Hicks as a nonconformist minister, most recently from Portsmouth.  Through a succession of restrictive laws and political maneuvering, the religious bigotry in England increased through the 1670s and 80s.  The mood and whim of those in power seemed to oscillate between leniency and oppressive persecution. I’m sure that Hicks wasn’t the only minister who was relentlessly targeted, tracked and fined for preaching to gatherings of nonconformists.  But the timing and location was such that on 24 Jun 1685,  Hicks was on hand to join rebel forces of the crown contender James Scott, Duke of Monmouth.  He probably hoped that he would receive better treatment and liberties under a different monarch.   The next day Hicks committed the treasonable offense of trying to persuade Monmouth’s English prisoners of war  to change their allegiance.

Their cause was short lived, for the rebel forces were quickly defeated by James II’s troops, with many rebels fleeing.  After a concentrated manhunt, Monmouth and his chiefs were captured and beheaded, although some of his rebels remained at large.  This is when Hicks and his companions Nelthorp and Dunne sought shelter at Moyles Court.  Their arrival was betrayed by their guide, and Alice was arrested as well as the fugitives and jailed at Salisbury pending trial.

PictureGrave of Alice (Beconshawe) Lisle in Ellingham, Hampshire

Alice was accused of treason.  Her  6 hour trial at Winchester Castle 27 Aug 1685 under the presiding “Hanging Judge” Jeffreys was considered a grave injustice.  Not only did the judge prosecute from the bench and enforce unfair procedural changes, but he also bullied the jury into declaring a guilty verdict in spite of their doubts.  Although she probably was guilty of knowingly sheltering fugitives, this was not properly proven in court, so she was unjustly sentenced.  She was the first of many casualties of Judge Jeffrey’s “Bloody Assizes”. Read More Here
Image result for moyles court
Moyles Court

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Joshua Whitaker, Sr. [Immigrated to America] and Jane

Birth:    December 22, 1675

London, Middlesex, England

Death: September 26, 1719 (43)

Lexington, Rowan County, Province of North Carolina

William Whitaker [also immigrated to America] and Elizabeth

Place of Burial: Jersey Baptist Church Cemetery, Davidson County, North Carolina, United States

Birth:    February 10, 1701

Grindleton, Yorkshire, England

Death: 1789 (87)

Rowan County, North Carolina, United States

Immediate Family:

Son of Joshua Whitaker, Sr. and Jane Whitaker’

Husband of Elizabeth Whitaker

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Mark Whitaker – Born in the USA and Tabitha Ann Whitaker

Kennett Square, Chester, Pennsylvania, United States

Death: March 2, 1780 (50-58)

Lincoln, Tennessee, United States

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John “Peg-Leg Whitaker and Martha Whitaker

Place of Burial:   Mulberry Cemetary, Tennessee, United States

Birth:    1760

Rowen, North Carolina, United States

Death: June 13, 1837 (77)

Mulberry, Lincoln, Tennessee, United States

Immediate Family:

Son of Mark Whitaker and Tabitha Ann Whitaker

Husband of Martha Whitaker

“John Whitaker sometimes Whitacre was believed to have been an indentured servant arriving in Virginia around the year 1690 who then moved onto Maryland and acquired land known as Whitaker’s Ridge in the vicinity of Baltimore. “ Here

Daniel Whitaker and Nancy Whitaker

Birth:    1795

Woodford, Kentucky, United States

Death: 1882 (87)

Obion, Tennessee, United States

Immediate Family:

Son of John Whitaker and Martha Whitaker

Husband of Nancy Whitaker

circuit-preacher-1800's
My Family’s Ancestor Revernd Milton J. Whitaker Was a Baptist Circuit Preacher

Milton James Whitaker and Sara Elizabeth Godsey Whitaker

Birth:    September 18, 1832

Mulberry, Lincoln, Tennessee, United States

Death: March 3, 1908 (75)

Clarkton, Dunklin, Missouri, United States

Immediate Family:

Son of Daniel Whitaker and Nancy Whitaker

Husband of  Sarah Elizabeth Godsey Whitaker

Father of Emma Lee Whitaker; Nancy D. Whitaker; Coldonia Olive “Callie” Whitaker; Elizabeth Almeda Capshaw; Rev. Robert N. Whitaker; Eliza Cordelia Whitaker; Lena Whitaker; Katie Ruth Whitaker; John Milton Whitaker; Ellen Whitaker and Sarah Drucilla Whitaker

Mayme Lena Whitaker Dunscomb and Kenley Liddell Dunscomb

Birth:   January 1, 1879

Tennessee, United States

Death: September 4, 1963 (84)

Clarkton, Dunklin, Missouri, United States

Immediate Family:

Daughter of Rev. Milton J. Whitaker and Sarah Elizabeth Godsey Whitaker

Mother of William Elmer Dunscomb [my grandfather] and others

William Elmer Dunscomb and Henrietta James Dunscomb

William Elmer Dunscomb was born in 1898, to Kenley Liddell Dunscomb and Lena Mayme Dunscomb.
William had 6 siblings: Norman Edgar Dunscomb, Reuben Thomas Dunscomb and 4 other siblings.
William married Henretta Dunscomb on month day 1920, at age 22 at marriage place, Kentucky.
Henrietta passed away in 1936, at age 38.

Father of Laura Mae Dunscomb [Baker], Imogene Dunscomb Boyd, and William Dunscomb

Laura Mae Dunscomb Baker and H.A. [Henry Albert or Hank] Baker

 

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I continue to exclaim about this, but my family traveled miles and miles, suffering hardship after hardship to travel from England to Clarkton, Missouri. That journey fascinates me.

© 2017 Jacki Kellum

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